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Anti-Cancer Diet: Green Tea and Broccoli Can Make Deadly Tumors Treatable

Diets with plant bases can promote better heart health, lower your blood pressure, and as it has been recently discovered, they can also make breast cancer tumors actually treatable.

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Anti-Cancer Diet: Green Tea and Broccoli Can Make Deadly Tumors Treatable

In an era when diets, kale smoothies, and other popular trends rise, a study isn’t required to tell people why eating fruit and vegetables are healthy.

Diets with plant bases can promote better heart health, lower your blood pressure, and as it has been recently discovered, they can also make breast cancer tumors actually treatable.

Studies

Many studies found the link between vegetables and fruit and cancer-avoiding properties, however the latest study looks at how multiple compounds, specifically two, can treat women that have even the most fatal of breast cancers.

 Researchers typical tend to focus research on one of the compounds to avoide instances of comingling, however a team strongly believed that sulforaphane, which is found in vegetable (cruciferous), and polyphenols, inside of green tea, will pair well, a release stated.

They wished for the the compounds to turn tumors that aren’t fueled by the estrogen hormone, or estrogen receptor–negatives, into a different version of the disease, also ER-positive.

ER-negative versions are far deadlier as hormonal therapies will not work on them, leaving women affected significantly fewer options for treatment.

Anti-Cancer Benefits

Because this study, which was published earlier this week in the journal Scientific Reports, had taken place in mice, it isn’t yet clear whether these results can also apply to a human’s breast cancer.

 The University of Alabama team hopes they can begin clinical trials with humans in order to discover whether eating broccoli may potentially save hundreds of lives.

However that doesn’t entirely mean you can’t implement “the epigenetics diet”, as the study’s co-author, Trygve Tollefsbol, names it. “Our studies suggest that the diet could be incorporated at any age and in patients who have estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer,” he told Newsweek via an email.

 “The consumption of this diet consisting of cruciferous vegetable and green tea is generally considered very safe,” he said.

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