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Try the New ‘Popeye Diet’ To Feel Smarter

Although spinach is not the ideal treat, it may make your brain stay younger and feel sharper, says new research.

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Try the New ‘Popeye Diet’ To Feel Smarter

Although spinach is not the ideal treat, it may make your brain stay younger and feel sharper, says new research.

Discoveries

Scientists discovered that eating rich vitamin K foods — like spinach, asparagus, kale, Brussels sprouts, and lettuce — may help some people retain sharp mental ability as they age. A study found that memory loss and thought declined significantly in those who ate more leafy greens than those who did not.

Nutrients like folate and vitamin K are thought to create a type of protection for the brain, although researchers ensure to stress that there is no proof eating vegetables will help in keeping the mind healthy throughout long periods.

The head of the Alzheimer's Society research, Dr. James Pickett, admitted that it isn’t much of a secret that eating vegetables can be good for human health, and may slow cognitive deterioration as individuals age.

"The researchers did not directly look at dementia, so we cannot say that it would delay or prevent the onset of the condition. However, older people who ate one or two servings of vitamin K rich food per day performed better on memory tests than those who didn't," the researcher said to Sputnik.

He added: "In fact, their scores were similar to those of people 11 years younger, irrespective of other factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, and education level. What's good for the heart is good for the head.”

Diet

A diet that is healthy, rich in nutrients that are essential to the body, and combined with routine exercise in addition to avoiding smoking, the doctor explained, may help reduce risks of obtaining dementia. He also urged that people pile their Christmas plated high with plenty of greens.

Martha Clare Morris, from Rush University in Chicago, led the study and said it is recommended that people eat around 1.3 green servings in the day. "Adding a daily serving of green, leafy vegetables to your diet may be a simple way to foster your brain health," said Dr. Morris.

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