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Diet Loaded with Apples and Tomatoes Can Repair Ex-Smokers’ Lungs, Study Says

The decline in function of the lungs over 10 years was slower in former smokers that had high tomato and fruit consumption, specifically apples, according to new studies by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Diet Loaded with Apples and Tomatoes Can Repair Ex-Smokers’ Lungs, Study Says

The decline in function of the lungs over 10 years was slower in former smokers that had high tomato and fruit consumption, specifically apples, according to new studies by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, which suggest that components of these ingredients may restore damage to the lungs caused by routine smoking.

The researchers discovered that adults that ate over 2 or more tomatoes or over 3 portions of fruit daily had slower damage to lung function when compared to people who ate under a tomato or a fruit portion daily.

Study

The researchers also inquired about several different dietary sources like dishes as well as processed foods that contain fruits in addition to vegetables—like tomato sauce—however, the effect had only been observed in fruits and veggies that were fresh.

"Diet could become one way of combating rising diagnosis of COPD around the world,” said Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, the school’s assistant professor.

The paper, a part of Ageing Lungs in European Cohorts funded by the European Commission in addition to being led by London’s  Imperial College London, found slower decline when pertaining to lung function in adults with the highest consumption of tomatoes, including people who never smoked as well as those who recently quit smoking. The findings were published in December’s issue of European Respiratory Journal.

"This study shows that diet might help repair lung damage in people who have stopped smoking. It also suggests that a diet rich in fruits can slow down the lung's natural aging process even if you have never smoked," Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, the assistant professor at Bloomberg School's Department of International Health as well as lead author of the study said. "The findings support the need for dietary recommendations, especially for people at risk of developing respiratory diseases such as COPD."

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